Tag Archives: LEAN Manufacturing

A Case Study on Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Over the past several years U.S. EPA’s Office of Reinvention has been involved in a number of “regulatory responsiveness” initiatives. These include the Common Sense Initiative, Project XL, and Pollution Prevention in Permitting Program (P4). In working with a variety of businesses in the context of these initiatives, certain project participants noted that corporate manufacturing strategies and initiatives often produced substantial resource productivity enhancements.

At the same time, the responsiveness and continuous improvement aspects of these strategies were driving on-going modifications to operating equipment and operating parameters that could be subject to new environmental permitting and/or modifications to existing permits. This meant that desired changes could be subject to regulatory bottlenecks (in terms of time, uncertainty, and administrative costs) that could constrain responsiveness, continuous improvement, and, ultimately resource productivity gains. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

United Technologies Corporation Case Study

United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX) is the $43-billion manufacturer working with more than 25,000 suppliers worldwide. Its products range from Sikorsky helicopters and Pratt & Whitney jet engines in the aerospace and defense sector, to Carrier air conditioners and Otis elevators in the commercial market. Three years ago, as part of a supply chain excellence initiative, UTC implemented a revolutionary initiative to ensure peak performance from its global supply base. UTC staffed teams of supply chain experts dedicated to share their deep knowledge and experience with suppliers, helping them achieve the highest levels of lean manufacturing, fiscal discipline nd operational excellence. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Boeing Case Study

General Manager, Airplane Production at Boeing, one earthquake in particular helped instigate a major cultural and physical change for its Boeing 737 manufacturing site in Renton, Washington. This potential tragedy resulted in a dramatic change to the face and working model of Boeing’s 737 operations that included production gains of 50%, a space reduction of 40%, and a cultural shift to on-site teamwork and persistent communication.

Boeing Case Study

The journey began in 2000. The ubiquitous 737 is Boeing’s most successful aircraft and commands 40% of the world’s commercial jet sales. Despite – or perhaps because of – its market leadership, Boeing was facing fierce competition amidst the added effects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on air travel and the race to incorporate lean manufacturing into its processes. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Case Study of Advanced Research and Complex Product Development Environments

Study about Advanced Research and Complex Product Development Environments

Abstract:~ The introduction of lean principles is a common approach for organizations seeking to improve quality, lower cost, and shorten time to market. Many companies have applied lean to manufacturing, but a smaller number have brought it upstream to product development. This research focuses on how organizations can begin the transformation to lean product development through three essays. The first study is a comparative case analysis comparing approaches based on “rational planning” and “disciplined problem solving” to identify their relative advantages and disadvantages and organizational characteristics that enable successful deployment. The comparison shows that in the case of non-routine processes like product development the disciplined problem solving approach is more effective, while the rational planning approach can be effective for highly routine aspects of the job.

Introduction:~ The development of new products is critical to the success of many companies. Increases in global competition, demanding customers seeking niche products, and rapid technology developments has changed the competitive landscape in several industries (Wheelwright and Clark 1992). In some industries, improving quality, lowering cost, and shortening lead time from concept to market while developing innovative products to meet customer needs is necessary to remain competitive; in other industries these qualities can provide the company a competitive advantage. One approach to achieving these goals is through the introduction of lean principles in product development (Wheelwright and Clark 1992; Morgan and Liker 2006; Barrett, Musso et al. 2009; Morgan and Liker 2011). Introducing lean principles into product development is a common approach for companies that have had success with lean manufacturing. This is a logical step as the magnitude of the costs and cycle time of development projects provides a rich target for improvement opportunities. Keep reading…

Case Studies for Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Case Studies about Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies

 

Background: In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

Realizing that this waste-focused paradigm shift held the potential to create positive environmental outcomes, EPA authorized this study of Corporate Environmental Management and Compliance, designed to analyze corporate business strategies and environmental management approaches and to assess the presence of waste elimination patterns similar to those observed in previous reinvention efforts. This project entailed the analysis of five “assembly” case studies and two “metal fabrication” case studies at the Boeing Company, an enterprise that has adopted, and is in the process of implementing, Lean Manufacturing principles. keep reading…

 

Case Study in an Integrated Steel Plant: Enhancing Productivity of hot metal in Blast furnace

Case Study about an Integrated Steel Plant: Enhancing Productivity of hot metal in Blast furnace

Abstract: Studies on applications of lean in a continuous process industry are limited. There is lot of opportunities for improvement in the process industries like steel if lean tools are utilized. This paper addresses the application of Value Stream Mapping as one of the Lean tools to eliminate waste, and improved operational procedures and productivity in a blast furnace of an integrated steel plant. Current state map is prepared and analyzed and suggested to improve the operational process by introducing supplementary raw materials and alternate fuel to increase the productivity. Accordingly the future state map is drawn. The study reveals that there is an improvement in the takt time by implementing the proposed changes if incorporated in the future state map.





Introduction: Globalization is making most of the organizations, sectors more intensely competitive. Many organizations are struggling to improve their operating performance in response to market demands for lower costs, higher-quality products and services, shorter lead times, and higher returns on investment in infrastructure and resources. The case study was carried out to address above issues in iron making of an integrated steel plant and to find out uncover hidden values to increase the productivity. To eliminate the waste and identify the non value added processes from the lean manufacturing perspective, the value Stream mapping is carried out to optimize the process and to increase the productivity.

Click here to read more on Integrated Steel Plant


Case Study on Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Case Study about Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background: In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors.





Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

Click here to read more on Lean Manufacturing Strategies


A Case Study for Lean Manufacturing Strategies

A Case Study about Lean Manufacturing Strategies Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background: In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.





Lean Manufacturing is the systematic elimination of waste by focusing on production costs, product quality and delivery, and worker involvement. In the 1950s, Taiichi Ohno, developer of the Toyota “just-in-time” Production System, created the modern intellectual and cultural framework for Lean Manufacturing and waste elimination. Ohno defined waste as “any human activity which absorbs resources but creates no value.” Largely, Lean Manufacturing represents a fundamental paradigm shift from traditional “batch and queue” mass production to production systems based on product aligned “single-piece flow, pull production.” Whereas “batch and queue” involves mass-production of large inventories of products in advance based on potential or predicted customer demands

Click here to read more on Lean Manufacturing Strategies


Study on Lean Manufacturing Initiatives at Boeing

The case examines the problems faced by leading aircraft manufacturer Boeing on the production front due to which it was even forced to close down its manufacturing plants for one month.





The case details the reasons for the failure of lean manufacturing initiatives implemented by Boeing in the early 1990s and the steps it took to overcome these problems. The case also provides information about the lean manufacturing concept, its history and benefits and highlights the differences between lean manufacturing and traditional manufacturing. Read more…

Case Study of Inspirepac

Challenge: Back in 2009, a number of the company’s employees attended a MAS-led factory visit to Unilever. It was a real eye opener for the team to see lean manufacturing applied so effectively and it proved the initiated spark for wanting to know more. At that time, the company was experiencing problems with throughput on the factory floor, made worse by unpredictable fluctuations in sales. It recognised that in order to grow the business, something had to change. Martin Brown, inspirepac’s Plant Director, said:…






Action: Working with MAS Advisor John Ransford, inspirepac’s lean journey began on the shop floor by identifying bottlenecks which were hampering production and implementing a number of tools to improve flow, including a simple tagging system and Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). The focus then turned to the paperwork trail from the office, which was causing ‘right first time’ issues for the production team. Strategy and planning for delivery was examined to remove any ‘wastes’ in the process and ensure all departments within the business were working together to the overall benefit of the customer…
Learn more about Inspirepac






Register to mark your Comments