Tag Archives: Natural Environment

A Case Study on Biodiversity Conservation

In brief, we learn that deforestation for implanting pastures is probably not economically justifiable at the individual rancher level and certainly not at greater spatial levels. We also show that wood extraction is not likely to be economically feasible for most landowners.

We learn that policy interventions to encourage biological diversity at the local level may focus upon informational barriers, conservation education and maximizing the sustainable, managed harvest of extractive and non-extractive goods and services other than cattle ranching. Finally, we learn that justification exists for integrating environmental policy in the Pantanal from local through, potentially international levels due to the global value of the Pantanal’s unique natural environment. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Case Study on Sustainable Development in Practice

Study about Sustainable Development in Practice

Introduction: Development is not just about growth. Likewise, sustainability is not just about protecting the environment. Both development and sustainability are primarily about people living in peace with each other and in equilibrium with the planet. Their rights, opportunities, choices, dignity and values are (or should be) at the centre of everything. Sustainable development is about meeting the needs of people today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

Inter-generational equity—avoiding the unjustified transfer of development risks from present to future generations, without sacrificing reductions in poverty and inequality today at the altar of future environmental concerns—is implicit in this approach to development.Current patterns of consumption and production risk breaching planetary boundaries. If the natural environment undergoes significant degradation, so too does the potential to improve people’s lives—both in this and subsequent generations. This is especially true for the world’s poorest—most of whom rely directly upon nature for their livelihoods, and whose prospects are therefore most directly affected by the threats to ecosystems. Keep reading…

Case Studies of Sustainable Development in Practice

Case Studies about Sustainable Development in Practice

Introduction: Development is not just about growth. Likewise, sustainability is not just about protecting the environment. Both development and sustainability are primarily about people living in peace with each other and in equilibrium with the planet. Their rights, opportunities, choices, dignity and values are (or should be) at the centre of everything. Sustainable development is about meeting the needs of people today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.

Inter-generational equity—avoiding the unjustified transfer of development risks from present to future generations, without sacrificing reductions in poverty and inequality today at the altar of future environmental concerns—is implicit in this approach to development.Current patterns of consumption and production risk breaching planetary boundaries. If the natural environment undergoes significant degradation, so too does the potential to improve people’s lives—both in this and subsequent generations. This is especially true for the world’s poorest—most of whom rely directly upon nature for their livelihoods, and whose prospects are therefore most directly affected by the threats to ecosystems.  Keep reading…

Case Study for Ecosystems

The natural environment underpins economic prosperity, health and wellbeing. Society relies on natural ecosystems for food, water, and air. Land, seas, rivers, woods and fields, parks and open spaces provide benefits so fundamental that they are often overlooked. However, worldwide urbanisation, rapid technological advances, population growth and ever-increasing global connectedness, along with the ascendance of the market as the pre-eminent global economic system have placed an ever-increasing demand on ecosystems and the services they provide.





Over the last decade the ecosystem approach has provided an increasingly valuable framework for policy makers and practitioners in conserving, managing and enhancing the natural environment. This derives from the adoption of the ecosystem approach by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) that defines it as ‘a strategy for the integrated management of land, water and living resources that promotes conservation and sustainable use in an equitable way, and 2) The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment that defined how human well being was critically dependent on the delivery of ecosystem goods and services.

Click here to read more on Ecosystems

Case Study for Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat

At Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat a once degraded dairy farm has been transformed into a rainforest paradise. The roperty has undergone significant revegetation and the focus is now on educating visitors on the importance of our natural environment and sustainable use of resources. The property also provides visitors with the opportunity to offset their travel emissions by participating in a tree planting project. Last year, this resulted in the property having carbon credits of 325 tonnes. Since 1994 when Jon and Peta Nott purchased the site of what is now Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat, they had a goal of converting the once degraded dairy farm into a rainforest paradise.






The couple wanted to put into practice their strong environmental values and they have been more then successful in this pursuit. Over the past 15 years they have developed Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat into a successful ecotourism accommodation provider. They have planted over 20,000 rainforest trees which sequester over 400 tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere. They actively engage their guests in their passion through education and carbon offsetting. For more information on Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat click here






Register to mark your Comments


Case study on Green Supply Chain Management


Green Supply Chain Management: A Case Study from Indian Electrical and Electronics Industry

Increasing awareness about environmental protection in India and world, the green trend of conserving the Earth‘s resources and protecting the environment is overwhelming, thereby exerting pressure on industries in India and worldwide.


India has gained its position among the top ten countries and has become one of the largest manufacturing economies of the world (Chetan Kumar M. Sedani, Ramesh R. Lakhe, 2011) [1]. The pressure and drive accompanying globalization has prompted industries to improve their environmental performance (Zhu and Sarkis, 2006) [10]. Consequently, industries have shown growing concern for the environment over the last decade.


Industrial environments have experienced drastic change and face competitive challenges. Recently supply chain management has directed its attention to the role of the supply chain in impacts to the natural environment. Click here to read more…

Case study on Green Supply Chain Management

Register to mark your Comments

Traditional Knowledge Vs. Patent System

Traditional knowledge (TK) is in simple terms knowledge systems held by indigenous communities, often relating to their surrounding natural environment. Through globalisation and the increased availability of this knowledge as well as the implementation of intellectual property systems in the developing world TK and its relationship with the IPR-system has become a much debated and highly complicated issue. Patents have been granted with knowledge that stems from TK, some of these patents have been challenged and accused of being examples of ”biopiracy”. The task of attempting to better adjust the patent system to TK is being undertaken for the most part by working groups attached to the Convention on Biodiversity and the World Intellectual Property Organization’s Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore. Due to amongst other things, the controversy of biopiracy much of the debate has been mired in what can be seen as post-colonial anger and guilt, it is highly politicised and often far removed from the legal issues at hand. This thesis attempts at reclaiming the issue from the political arena and approach the imperfect interaction between the two knowledge systems as a legal problem instead of a political one.
Read more…

Register to mark your comments