Tag Archives: pollution prevention

A Case Study on Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Over the past several years U.S. EPA’s Office of Reinvention has been involved in a number of “regulatory responsiveness” initiatives. These include the Common Sense Initiative, Project XL, and Pollution Prevention in Permitting Program (P4). In working with a variety of businesses in the context of these initiatives, certain project participants noted that corporate manufacturing strategies and initiatives often produced substantial resource productivity enhancements.

At the same time, the responsiveness and continuous improvement aspects of these strategies were driving on-going modifications to operating equipment and operating parameters that could be subject to new environmental permitting and/or modifications to existing permits. This meant that desired changes could be subject to regulatory bottlenecks (in terms of time, uncertainty, and administrative costs) that could constrain responsiveness, continuous improvement, and, ultimately resource productivity gains. Click here to read more…

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A Case Study on Safety Assessment of FPSO Turret-Mooring System Using Approximate Reasoning and Evidential Reasoning

A Case Study about Safety Assessment of FPSO Turret-Mooring System Using Approximate Reasoning and Evidential Reasoning

Abstract: Numerous Acts of Parliament and Statutory Instruments which apply to Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) developments in the United Kingdom Continental Shelf (UKCS), covering a wide range of issues including health, technical safety, work place safety, lifting operations, environmental protection and pollution prevention and control, are described. A comprehensive study of system safety evaluation of a typical turret-mooring system used on FPSOs is described in this paper. A safety assessment method suggested using approximate reasoning and evidential reasoning approaches is proposed in this study. Subjective safety modelling at the bottom level in a hierarchical framework is carried out using an approximate reasoning approach. The evidential reasoning method is used to combine or aggregate safety estimates at lower levels to produce the safety estimate at the system level. The four main sub-systems (Turret (T), Fluid Transfer System (FTS), Turret Transfer System (TTS) and Interfacing System (IS)) are thoroughly examined in order to perform a subjective safety assessment of the turret-mooring system.

Introduction: During the 1990’s there was an increasing move in the North Sea sector to subset and deepwater production with the use of floating production and storage systems. A key innovative technology is the use of Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessels and other Floating Storage Units (FSUs). They are either purpose built or converted from tankers or bulk carriers. The term FSUs may also encompass simpler systems such as storage and offloading buoys. An integral part of such systems is a turret-mooring system that keeps the vessel on station via single-point mooring and allows the vessel to rotate in response to weather conditions. In 1981 the first FPSO world-wide was installed. Keep reading…

Case Study on Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Case Study about Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background: In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors.





Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

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A Case Study for Lean Manufacturing Strategies

A Case Study about Lean Manufacturing Strategies Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background: In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.





Lean Manufacturing is the systematic elimination of waste by focusing on production costs, product quality and delivery, and worker involvement. In the 1950s, Taiichi Ohno, developer of the Toyota “just-in-time” Production System, created the modern intellectual and cultural framework for Lean Manufacturing and waste elimination. Ohno defined waste as “any human activity which absorbs resources but creates no value.” Largely, Lean Manufacturing represents a fundamental paradigm shift from traditional “batch and queue” mass production to production systems based on product aligned “single-piece flow, pull production.” Whereas “batch and queue” involves mass-production of large inventories of products in advance based on potential or predicted customer demands

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Case Study Lean Manufacturing


Case Studies Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies, Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background

In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

Realizing that this waste-focused paradigm shift held the potential to create positive environmental outcomes, EPA authorized this study of Corporate Environmental Management and Compliance, designed to analyze corporate business strategies and environmental management approaches and to assess the presence of waste elimination patterns similar to those observed in previous reinvention efforts. This project entailed the analysis of five “assembly” case studies and two “metal fabrication” case studies at the Boeing Company, an enterprise that has adopted, and is in the process of implementing, Lean Manufacturing principles. The case studies describe various Lean efforts at Boeing’s Auburn Machine Fabrication Shop and its Everett airplane assembly plant, and demonstrate how Boeing implements and utilizes Lean strategies in its manufacturing settings. The case studies also describe various resource productivity gains associated with the identified Lean activities, and several obstacles encountered by the Compa in its efforts to implement specific Lean projects.

What Is Lean Manufacturing?

In its most basic form, Lean Manufacturing is the systematic elimination of waste by focusing on production costs, product quality and delivery, and worker involvement. In the 1950s, Taiichi Ohno, developer of the Toyota “just-in-time” Production System, created the modern intellectual and cultural framework for Lean Manufacturing and waste elimination. Ohno defined waste as “any human activity which absorbs resources but creates no value.” Largely, Lean Manufacturing represents a fundamental paradigm shift from traditional “batch and queue” mass production to production systems based on product aligned “single-piece flow, pull production.” Read more on Lean Manufacturing

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