Tag Archives: productivity gains

A Case Study on Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Over the past several years U.S. EPA’s Office of Reinvention has been involved in a number of “regulatory responsiveness” initiatives. These include the Common Sense Initiative, Project XL, and Pollution Prevention in Permitting Program (P4). In working with a variety of businesses in the context of these initiatives, certain project participants noted that corporate manufacturing strategies and initiatives often produced substantial resource productivity enhancements.

At the same time, the responsiveness and continuous improvement aspects of these strategies were driving on-going modifications to operating equipment and operating parameters that could be subject to new environmental permitting and/or modifications to existing permits. This meant that desired changes could be subject to regulatory bottlenecks (in terms of time, uncertainty, and administrative costs) that could constrain responsiveness, continuous improvement, and, ultimately resource productivity gains. Click here to read more…

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Case Studies on Novell Uses Collaborative Remote Support To Transform Its Customer Experience

In the services industry, the ultimate goal is to increase customer satisfaction while lowering support costs with improved productivity. Unfortunately, introducing new tools for productivity gains often results in lower satisfaction. But Novell cracked this nut. During a time of constrained budgets, limited resources, and increased service demands, Novell implemented a new remote support tool from Bomgar and realized significant productivity and customer satisfaction improvements.

Novell worked with Bomgar’s Remote Support Software to overcome common people, process, and technology issues to ensure a smooth customer experience. Novell introduced multichannel communications to improve its customer service model; created a standard support environment; improved collaboration and staff efficiency; and provided a more flexible environment where customer challenges are solved in real time. The result? Novell shifted 90% of its incoming support calls to an online chat model. This improved staff productivity by 30% and cut the average cost per request in half — all while improving customer satisfaction by 15%! Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Human Machine Interface as an Emerging Risk

Study about Human Machine Interface as an Emerging Risk

Introduction:~ Industrialization brought widespread use of tools and machines to the workplace and these have steadily grown in number and complexity since that time. Design was driven by technical requirements and rarely took account of the needs and characteristics of the operators. As a result, workers often had to adapt to processes determined by the technical system. Only in the middle of the 20th century did the operator gain more attention in the design process of work systems, leading to changes in design paradigms, culminating over recent decades in a shift to user-centred design. With the introduction of ergonomics, or human factors, workers’ health and safety has been improved by adapting machines and tools to humans’ skills, limitations and anatomy. Furthermore, systems of work are increasingly constructed as a socio-technical system consisting of workers, tools, tasks and work contexts.

Ergonomics is a broad discipline, which ranges from use of anthropometrics in design of equipment and workplace to cognitive ergonomics and the concept of “usability”. The focus on user-friendly design of technical systems, machines and tools has increased with the recognition that such systems provide effective support for users, improving not only their effectiveness and efficiency, but also satisfaction (Sarodnick & Brau, 2006). Nevertheless, efficiency and productivity gains are far more common as a reason for applying ergonomic principles compared with employees’ wellbeing, despite the longstanding link between ergonomics and safety and health at work Research and practical experience show that systems which neglect ergonomics, particularly HMI, are more likely to give rise to occupational diseases, operating errors and accidents. Keep reading..

Case Study on Productivity Adjustments and Learning-by-Doing as Human Capital

Case Study about Productivity Adjustments and Learning-by-Doing as Human Capital

Abstract: This paper measures plant-level productivity gains associated with learning curves across the entire manufacturing sector. We measure these gains at plant startups and also after major employment changes. We find: 1.) The gains are strongly associated with a variety of human capital measures implying that learning-by-doing is largely a firm-specific human capital investment. 2.) This implicit investment is large; many plants invest as much in learning-by-doing as they invest in physical capital and more than they invest in formal job training or R&D. 3.) This investment differs persistently over industries and is higher with greater R&D; hence measured returns to R&D may be overstated. 4.) Consistent with a search model, the human capital investment is much larger following employment decreases than increases.





Background :General theoretical approach In order to measure the breadth and depth of learning-by-doing across the manufacturing sector it is necessary to derive a more general methodology than that used in previous studies. Moreover, a general survey must empirically distinguish learning-by-doing from other causal explanations of productivity gain rather than simply assume that learning causes these gains. Following Bahk and Gort, we define learning-by-doing as the accumulation of knowledge and skills as a by-product of the production of goods and services. Our focus also is on firm-specific learning-by-doing because, presumably, to the extent that learning-by-doing generates general human capital, that knowledge is readily available to a new plant and would not need to be generated anew.

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A Case Study for CRM Adoption Success Factor Analysis and Six Sigma DMAIC Application

CRM Adoption Success Factor Analysis and Six Sigma DMAIC Application

Abstract: With today’s increasingly competitive economy, many organizations have initiated customer relationship management (CRM) projects to improve customer satisfaction, revenue growth and employee productivity gains. However, only a few successful CRM implementations have successfully completed.





In order to enhance the CRM implementation process and increase the success rate, in this paper, first we present the most significant success factors for CRM implementation identified by the results of literature reviews and a survey we conducted. Then we propose a strategy to integrate Six Sigma DMAIC methodology with the CRM implementation process addressing five critical success factors (CSF). Finally, we provide a case study to show how the proposed approach can be applied in the real CRM implementation projects. We onclude that by considering the critical success factors, the proposed approach can emphasize the critical part of implementation process and provide high possibility of CRM adoption success.




Introduction: Customer Relationship Management (CRM) was first introduced in the United States in 1990 and has evolved from the Sales Force Automation (SFA), Customer Service System (CSS) to Call Center. It integrates the concepts of modern marketing and field services. It also combines Computer Telephone Integrated Technology (CTIT) and Internet Technology (IT). Throughout more than ten years of evolution, CRM products have become multifarious. In the Chinese market, there are not only many worldfamous vendors of CRM products, such as SAP, Microsoft, Oracle, and Sieble, but also local Chinese vendors such as Unifa, Kingdee and Powerise. Many companies in China have already adopted these CRM applications and have gained benefits such as high customer satisfaction, fast revenue growth and employees’ productivity improvement..

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A Case Study on Novell Inc.

Executive Summary: In the services industry, the ultimate goal is to increase customer satisfaction while lowering support costs with improved productivity. Unfortunately, introducing new tools for productivity gains often results in lower satisfaction. But Novell cracked this nut. During a time of constrained budgets, limited resources, and increased service demands, Novell implemented a new remote support tool from Bomgar and realized significant productivity and customer satisfaction improvements. Novell worked with Bomgar’s Remote Support Software to overcome common people, process, and technology issues to ensure a smooth customer experience…
Click here to read more on Novell Inc.








Case Study: 3M Library Systems

Customer Satisfaction from “Bulletproof” Technology

Many libraries embrace new technology as a response to increasing demands, often coupled with steady or declining budgets. For North Carolina’s Wilson County Public Library, the implementation of a radio frequency identification (RFID) system was driven largely by a desire to improve customer satisfaction among the county’s 80,000 residents.

“When I joined the staff, the board told me they wanted to do whatever was necessary to create a customer experience that was as efficient and pleasant as possible,” recalled Greg Needham, Library Director. He immediately thought of RFID technology for the improvements it would bring to the customer experience, as well as for the productivity gains that would be possible. Click here to read more…

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Case Study Lean Manufacturing


Case Studies Examining Lean Manufacturing Strategies, Pollution Prevention, and Environmental Regulatory Management Implications

Background

In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

Realizing that this waste-focused paradigm shift held the potential to create positive environmental outcomes, EPA authorized this study of Corporate Environmental Management and Compliance, designed to analyze corporate business strategies and environmental management approaches and to assess the presence of waste elimination patterns similar to those observed in previous reinvention efforts. This project entailed the analysis of five “assembly” case studies and two “metal fabrication” case studies at the Boeing Company, an enterprise that has adopted, and is in the process of implementing, Lean Manufacturing principles. The case studies describe various Lean efforts at Boeing’s Auburn Machine Fabrication Shop and its Everett airplane assembly plant, and demonstrate how Boeing implements and utilizes Lean strategies in its manufacturing settings. The case studies also describe various resource productivity gains associated with the identified Lean activities, and several obstacles encountered by the Compa in its efforts to implement specific Lean projects.

What Is Lean Manufacturing?

In its most basic form, Lean Manufacturing is the systematic elimination of waste by focusing on production costs, product quality and delivery, and worker involvement. In the 1950s, Taiichi Ohno, developer of the Toyota “just-in-time” Production System, created the modern intellectual and cultural framework for Lean Manufacturing and waste elimination. Ohno defined waste as “any human activity which absorbs resources but creates no value.” Largely, Lean Manufacturing represents a fundamental paradigm shift from traditional “batch and queue” mass production to production systems based on product aligned “single-piece flow, pull production.” Read more on Lean Manufacturing

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Case Studies in Lean Manufacturing


Background

In working with regulated industries over the past eight years, many EPA regulatory reinvention initiatives have recognized an emerging and very real redefinition of the manufacturing landscape. Largely, this movement has arisen in the context of today’s increasingly competitive “immediate” global market, requiring companies to conceive and deliver products faster, at lower cost, and of better quality than their competitors. Lean manufacturing is a leading manufacturing paradigm of this fast-paced market economy, with a fundamental focus on the systematic elimination of waste that holds the potential to produce meaningful environmental results.

Realizing that this waste-focused paradigm shift held the potential to create positive environmental outcomes, EPA authorized this study of Corporate Environmental Management and Compliance, designed to analyze corporate business strategies and environmental management approaches and to assess the presence of waste elimination patterns similar to those observed in previous reinvention efforts. This project entailed the analysis of five “assembly” case studies and two “metal fabrication” case studies at the Boeing Company, an enterprise that has adopted, and is in the process of implementing, Lean Manufacturing principles. The case studies describe various Lean efforts at Boeing’s Auburn Machine Fabrication Shop and its Everett airplane assembly plant, and demonstrate how Boeing implements and utilizes Lean strategies in its manufacturing settings. The case studies also describe various resource productivity gains associated with the identified Lean activities, and several obstacles encountered by the Company in its efforts to implement specific Lean projects.

for more info  Case Studies in Lean Manufacturing

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