Tag Archives: Responsiveness

A Case Study on Lean Manufacturing Strategies

Over the past several years U.S. EPA’s Office of Reinvention has been involved in a number of “regulatory responsiveness” initiatives. These include the Common Sense Initiative, Project XL, and Pollution Prevention in Permitting Program (P4). In working with a variety of businesses in the context of these initiatives, certain project participants noted that corporate manufacturing strategies and initiatives often produced substantial resource productivity enhancements.

At the same time, the responsiveness and continuous improvement aspects of these strategies were driving on-going modifications to operating equipment and operating parameters that could be subject to new environmental permitting and/or modifications to existing permits. This meant that desired changes could be subject to regulatory bottlenecks (in terms of time, uncertainty, and administrative costs) that could constrain responsiveness, continuous improvement, and, ultimately resource productivity gains. Click here to read more…

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Case Studies on TD Bank

Service is a key competitive differentiator in the banking industry. If customers don’t like the way you treat them, they can easily take their money right down the street.

That’s why TD Bank works hard to maintain a strong corporate culture of service and responsiveness.The company—which has grown rapidly from $2 billion in assets in the early 1990s to approximately $40 billion in assets today—saw an opportunity to improve email service levels and provide customers with easily accessible answers to their banking questions.

TD Bank also sought to improve the efficiency of its service operations across the board, maintain cost control, and accomplish all this while its technology resources supported an aggressive acquisition strategy. TD Bank succeeded on all counts with the help of RightNow’s on demand CRM software solution and professional services. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Klipsch Audio Technologies

Klipsch needed its business systems to keep pace with the company’s growth. In addition to growing organically, Klipsch made a series of strategic acquisitions that had left the company maintaining five instances of an obsolete ERP system in the US and one instance of a legacy system in Europe. These disjointed systems routinely required heroic efforts at month-end and often produced multiple versions of the truth.

Consolidated financials across the fragmented systems were being produced in spreadsheets with extensive manual effort; customer orders across product lines or geographic regions had to be entered into multiple systems and invoiced separately; and difficulty in compiling supply chain planning information limited responsiveness to changing customer demand, thereby slowing changes to overseas suppliers. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Dell

Using Dell Computers as a case study in talks and discussions about social media marketing almost begs for eye-rolls from the audience these days. Whether it’s the telling of the Dell Hell blogger responsiveness that got the company into social in the first place; IdeaStorm, which revolutionized corporate research and development; or the @DellOutlet Twitter account that smacked the social media purists who claimed you can’t sell using social media right across the face with $6.5 million in 18 months, we talk about Dell a lot.

Dell Case Study

While everyone is constantly on the lookout for new case studies and examples of how companies are leveraging social media to be successful, Dell keeps popping up. Why? Because they immersed themselves early and became a living example of how a company, particularly a large, enterprise company, could be a social business.

My friend Geoff Livingston and I were invited to Round Rock, Texas, last week to visit the Dell campus. We were both there to provide a panel discussion for Dell employees on the state and future of social media marketing. Lionel Menchaca, the original Dell blogger and Dell Hell responder, was our host and moderator for the panel. We covered a lot of ground and, I think, served as useful voices for the folks there. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Adopting ERP at SCL

Automobile component manufacturer Sundaram-Clayton (SCL) wanted to squeeze the maximum from its ERP system. To do this, it built its ERP atop an architecture that supported high levels of reliability, stability, and scalability. After much planning and evaluation, CIO T G Dhandapani adopted an adaptive infrastructure model. Today, SCL’s SAP R/3 runs on this architecture offering superior performance and greater responsiveness.

Business at SCL: Belonging to the TVS group of companies, one of India’s largest automotive component manufacturing and distributing groups, SCL has two divisions—the Brakes and Die-casting divisions. The company’s corporate office is in Chennai; it has three manufacturing units (two in Chennai and one in Hosur), a warehouse in Bangalore, registered offices, area offices and sales representatives at various locations nationwide. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Senco Electroniccs

If I were Skip Grenoble, I would advise Ms. Shannon to utilize air transportation as this would afford Senco greater flexibility and responsiveness in reacting to fluctuations in demand in a high tech industry that is characterized by short product life cycle. As a U.S based contract manufacturer of laptop and personal computers, in my opinion, Senco is providing a fairly high substitutable service. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Enterprise Information Systems Project Implementation: ERP in Rolls-Royce

Case Study about Enterprise Information Systems Project Implementation: ERP in Rolls-Royce

Abstract:- Economic globalization and internationalization of operations are essential factors in integration of suppliers, partners and customers within and across national borders, the objective being to achieve integrated supply chains. In this effort, implementation of information technologies and systems such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) facilitate the desired level of integration. There are cases of successful and unsuccessful implementations. The principal reason for failure is often associated with poor management of the implementation process. This paper examines key dimensions of implementation of ERP system within a large manufacturing organisation and identifies core issues to confront in successful implementation of enterprise information system.

Introduction:- The global nature of modern marketplace requires active players to internationalise their operations. In the past, companies were used to competing based on one or two competitive performance objectives such as price and quality. However, present markets demand both price and quality in addition to greater flexibility and responsiveness and thus today’s organisations must compete based on all competitive objectives. In order to achieve such simultaneity in performance objectives, some organisations have decentralised their operations by global outsourcing of activities. This places enormous challenge on companies to achieve a co-ordinated and integrated supply chain. Keep reading…

Case Study on Informal Communication Network Within An Organization: Workplace Communication

Study about Informal Communication Network Within An Organization: Workplace Communication

Abstract: This paper is an attempt to bring forth, analyse and compare different aspects in terms of workplace communication. It focuses in the informal communication which considered a significant factor for an organization’s internal and external progress. It is a study on literature, which aims to link the literature findings with a real case of a company which seeks to improve its workplace communication. In the end, it proposes certain strategies to be followed in order to control and affect the existed informal communications network. Thus, cultivation of “Communities of Practice” and “Face-to Face contacts” are expected to influence and turn the informal network to an added-value for the organization.

Introduction:~ Forty years ago, James Granger (1970) described a number of obstacles that companies faced in order to gain an effective communication. He identified: the existence of fear among employees; the inertia due to a non-rewarding system; the sense that management did not care about their problems; the fear that disagreement will block their promotions; and the lack of supervisory accessibility and responsiveness. To cope with that, Granger claimed that companies should take three actions, in order to change radically the environment: (a) the management should start building trust between them and employees; (b) the management should put a premium on integrity; and, (c) they should get out of their offices and find out what’s going on, in their organization. Keep reading…

A Case Study on Informal Communication Network within an Organization

A Case Study about Informal Communication Network within an Organization: Workplace Communication

Abstract: This paper is an attempt to bring forth, analyse and compare different aspects in terms of workplace communication. It focuses in the informal communication which considered a significant factor for an organization’s internal and external progress. It is a study on literature, which aims to link the literature findings with a real case of a company which seeks to improve its workplace communication. In the end, it proposes certain strategies to be followed in order to control and affect the existed informal communications network. Thus, cultivation of “Communities of Practice” and “Face-to Face contacts” are expected to influence and turn the informal network to an added-value for the organization.

Introduction: Forty years ago, James Granger (1970) described a number of obstacles that companies faced in order to gain an effective communication. He identified: the existence of fear among employees; the inertia due to a non-rewarding system; the sense that management did not care about their problems; the fear that disagreement will block their promotions; and the lack of supervisory accessibility and responsiveness. To cope with that, Granger claimed that companies should take three actions, in order to change radically the environment: (a) the management should start building trust between them and employees; (b) the management should put a premium on integrity; and, (c) they should get out of their offices and find out what’s going on, in their organization. Over the years, different studies concluded that top management is necessary to build the right infrastructure of communication within the organization. When an organization grows, it is easier to be entrapped in a complicated system of communicating. keep reading…

A Study on Resource Pooling Principle

A Study about Resource Pooling Principle

Abstract: Since the ARPA net, network designers have built localized mechanisms for statistical multiplexing, load balancing, and failure resilience, often without understanding the broader implications. These mechanisms are all types of resource pooling, which means making a collection of resources behave like a single pooled resource. We believe that the natural evolution of the Internet is that it should achieve resource pooling by harnessing the responsiveness of multipath-capable end systems. We argue that this approach will solve the problems and limitations of the current piecemeal approaches.

Introduction: There is a silent revolution that is reshaping the Internet. It began with the original design of statistical multiplexing through packet switching. As demands on the Internet grew, network operators began to use traffic engineering to balance load, and sites began to be multihomed for improved resilience against failures. The revolution is that now end systems are involved in managing wide-area traffic patterns, for example peer-to-peer applications, or load balancing by Google and Akamai across globally-distributed server farms. These mechanisms are all examples of resource pooling. The general concept is that the network’s resources should behave as though they make up a single pooled resource; the aims are to increase reliability, flexibility and efficiency. Keep reading…