Tag Archives: Succession Planning

A Case Study on Best Practices in Health Leadership Talent Management and Succession Planning

Strong leadership is likely the single most important driver of overall organizational performance, and well-constructed talent management and succession planning systems remain critical to developing and retaining a deep bench of strong leaders. Nowhere is the need for effective talent management and succession planning more pronounced than in the dynamic, complex healthcare industry, where leaders face unprecedented pressure to transform their organizations so as to meet growing demands for high quality, cost-effective care. Click here to read more…

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A Case Study on Approach to Talent Management: Allstate Inc.

These responsibilities included examining the business strategies to define and develop the capabilities required for key roles at various levels. To accomplish this, we identified a set of competencies or success factors that link many of our talent systems together. As a result we adjusted the way Allstate assesses people for hiring, promotion, and development. It included aligning development products and processes to reinforce and build the capabilities defined by our strategies. We linked together processes and practices beyond learning that effect performance, such as performance management, succession planning, talent reviews, development, and so forth. Click here to read more…

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Case Study in Talent Management: Revelation Consulting Ltd

Talent management, succession planning and knowledge management seem like HR buzzwords of the last decade, yet for some businesses they represent a very real and very threatening problem.A global engineering company with an outstanding reputation has a highly skilled and experienced workforce with experience going back to the first jet aircraft, the first nuclear power stations and the first large scale materials handling systems in the UK.

The problem is that 50% of these people will reach retirement age in the next 5 years. This means that 50% of the company’s tacit knowledge will disappear, and the older installations that the company still supports will be left with no instruction manual. Historically, the company has had no formal knowledge management structure, and knowledge was passed across generations using the time honoured methods of apprenticeship and team work. Click here to read more…

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Case Study for Succession Planning

Impact on Organizational Performance in IT Sector

There was a time when organizations had many managerial levels, and the abundant leaders spent a substantial amount of time in strategic activities such as process improvement, training and mentoring. Employees had expectations of staying with an employer for decades and hoped that after a few years of distinguished service they might be invited to join the ranks of management trainees. With the luxury of time, supervisors had the opportunity to observe direct reports across many situations and guide employees with high potential toward future career opportunities. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Succession Planning

Case Study - Succession Planning

Succession planning helps organizations assess where they are going, identify the people they need to get there, and then plan for, recruit and develop their human resources based on a vision of the future.


This paper focuses on succession planning as an outcome of three key strategies – culture, planning and strategic recruitment – that must be at work in an organization in order for continuity of qualified leadership and planned organizational growth to take place.


What is succession planning? Simply put, it is the process of identifying and developing people who are already within your organization to take on future leadership roles. Click here to read more…

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Case Study on Succession Planning

Succession planning helps organizations assess where they are going, identify the people they need to get there, and then plan for, recruit and develop their human resources based on a vision of the future. This paper focuses on succession planning as an outcome of three key strategies – culture, planning and strategic recruitment – that must be at work in an organization in order for continuity of qualified leadership and planned organizational growth to take place.






What is succession planning? Simply put, it is the process of identifying and developing people who are already within your organization to take on future leadership roles. Why is it important? People are the most important assets of every volunteer-driven organization. It takes time to identify people who are committed to your vision, to engage them and bring them up through the organization from attending their first event to joining a working group or committee, and one day putting their name forward for election to the board. Learn more information on Succession Planning






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Case Study on Paewai Mullins Shearing

The Productivity Challenge: The goal over the last 50+ years has been to grow the business for future generations, driven by the family’s strong Maori values for working and living. The Directors, Koro and Mavis Mullins, have faced several challenges in growing the business. Sheep numbers and wool prices have decreased over the last five years. Many young employees have come into the business with few skills which requires considerable investment.

A tight international labour market has lured some of their skilled employees overseas in search of higher wages. They have also faced mounting heath and safety concerns as the average age of shearers has increased over the years. Over recent years the focus has been on succession planning for the smooth transition of management of the business from the third to the fourth generation of the family. The challenges faced include ensuring continued growth of the business, transfer of knowledge, building leadership skills, upholding their reputation as an industry leader and preservation of key systems and networks. Click here to read more…

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Case study on Kapiti Island Alive

The productivity challenge: Kapiti Island Alive’s business is growing at around 20 percent annually, with a high number of international visitors. Meeting the needs of more demanding client groups has put pressure on directors John Barrett and Amo Clark to adjust the style of business they operate, and the facilities and products they provide. The challenge for the organisation was how to manage customer growth within the staff and resource constraints typical of a small business, while developing and up-skilling staff for succession planning. Click here to read more…

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Case Studies on Dresser-Rand

After being spun off from Ingersoll-Rand in 2005, Dresser-Rand was left with “no training and development organization, no leadership training, no technical training, no performance management system, and no way to capture knowledge across thecompany,” explained Jeff Grenzer. “In other words, we had to start from scratch an entire program in 14 languages for over 5,500 employees in 26 countries and over 50 locations.”

Dresser Industries Case Study

Jeff continued, “Without a centralized training and development group to develop a global strategy Dresser- Rand relied on 637 training vendors worldwide. The company was spending an incredible amount of money and the learning was never measured. Subject Matter Experts and engineers became trainers. Succession planning was non existent, and basic training policies had not been developed. With 40 percent of our workforce becoming eligible for retirement in less than four years, the organization’s future success depended heavily on our ability to create and maintain a learning and development culture. Click here to read more…

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Case Studies on Succession Planning at Ranbaxy

In December 2003, S D Brar (Brar), CEO and Managing Director of Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd., (Ranbaxy) announced his decision to resign from his post. Brar was to complete his tenure in July 2004. He named Dr Brian Tempest (President, Pharmaceutical Division, Ranbaxy) as his successor. Brar’s decision to step down generated mixed responses from industry watchers, analysts and the investor community. Some media reports claimed that Brar’s exit from the company was a result of the strained relationships between Ranbaxy’s professional managers and the promoter family.

A few analysts said that Brar had no choice but to leave the company as Malvinder Singh and Shivinder Singh (sons of Ranbaxy’s founder, the late Parvinder Singh, and owners of more than 32% of stake in the company) wanted to establish their control over the management of the company. Official sources denied this, stating that a succession plan had already been put in place, and that Brar’s resignation was a part of that plan. However, the controversy regarding Brar’s departure refused to die out. Click here to read more…

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