Tag Archives: Teamwork

A Case Study on Multicultural Teams

Multicultural teams – curse or blessing? With this provocative question, Lianne Roembke presents in a rather drastic manner the spectrum of the possible outcomes of multicultural teamwork. What makes this remark so powerful is that it applies not only to missionaries (as originally implied by the author), but to any groups which may include members from several cultures or nations: diplomats, soldiers, consultants, marketers, sportspeople, flight attendants, scientists, or engineers. Indeed, managing multicultural teams can be a tightrope walk: on the one hand, when not handled properly, such teams can turn into extremely irksome stumbling blocks for a company or a project. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Case Study on Fort Knox focus on safety

Our Fort Knox team is demonstrating how commitment and teamwork can dramatically improve safety performance through its “See It, Own It, Solve It” (SOS) program, developed in 2007. Driven at the employee level with support from management, Fort Knox’s mine and mill workers are encouraged to watch for and record both safe and unsafe practices on SOS observation cards. SOS team representatives meet monthly to review the observations and develop strategies to reinforce safe behaviours and correct unsafe ones. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Bank of Montreal Case Study

In 1990 the Bank of Montreal adopted a new corporate strategic plan to guide the Bank into the 21st century: to create an organization capable of constantly learning and transforming itself. When the Chairman of the Bank of Montreal commissioned Moriyama & Teshima to design the Bank’s new corporate university, he wanted more than just a building. He wanted us to help evolve a new bank culture where employees would be encouraged to strive for creativity, excellence, and teamwork. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Case Studies on Qwest

1997 was a banner year for Quest Computer Corporation, a leading manufacturer of personal computers. The company surpassed $15 billion in sales, nearly seven times its revenues in 1992, the year John Clarke took over as CEO. Clarke is a hard-driving, no-nonsense leader. His vision was to create a $30 billion enterprise by the year 2000, but things were slowly started to crumble around him. What once had been an open and productive atmosphere that cultured teamwork, was now deteriorating under the strains of political infighting, cronyism, and allegations of sexual harassment.

n the eye of the storm was Samuel Anderson, vice president of human resources. Anderson and Clarke worked together in the eighties at another corporation before Clarke came to Quest in 1992. Three years later Anderson followed. Anderson immediately started using his relationship with Clarke to influence business decisions. Anderson also leveraged his ties to discreetly resolve two allegations of sexual harassment against him. Although the majority of senior executives and managers believed Clarke was an extremely tenacious and good executive, they also believed he was getting bad advice and accepting it. Clarke, when asked about the sexual harassment complaints against Anderson, replied, “People make things up. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

Boeing Case Study

General Manager, Airplane Production at Boeing, one earthquake in particular helped instigate a major cultural and physical change for its Boeing 737 manufacturing site in Renton, Washington. This potential tragedy resulted in a dramatic change to the face and working model of Boeing’s 737 operations that included production gains of 50%, a space reduction of 40%, and a cultural shift to on-site teamwork and persistent communication.

Boeing Case Study

The journey began in 2000. The ubiquitous 737 is Boeing’s most successful aircraft and commands 40% of the world’s commercial jet sales. Despite – or perhaps because of – its market leadership, Boeing was facing fierce competition amidst the added effects of the 9/11 terrorist attacks on air travel and the race to incorporate lean manufacturing into its processes. Click here to read more…

Register to mark your Comments

A Study on Sustainable Performance Improvement

A Study about Sustainable Performance Improvement

Good managers want to improve their performance, as evidenced by their insatiable interest in new books about management excellence, and their willingness to carve time out of busy schedules for workshops that promise management strategies to revitalize organizations, foster teamwork, and improve the performance of enterprises. Many models of managed performance improvement surfaced over the past decade, although most were not called “models,” as such. But to the extent that these programs claim a causal relationship between normative management behaviors and desired enterprise performance, they constitute models that warrant rigorous evaluation, in terms of measured effectiveness, compared to both their claimed results and competing models of performance improvement.

Many management behavioral models are inadequate in other ways, besides lacking an empirical basis. Some models prove too complicated to assimilate and put into practice, such as conditional or situational models that expect a manager to adopt different supervisory behaviors based on different attributes of the group being supervised or the task at hand. Experienced managers know that they will be perceived as more credible and trusted if subordinates do notexperience variances in management style from task to task, group to group, or individual to individual. Some management models are descriptive and analytic, rather than normative, providing little guidance on how to put them into practice. And the models that are normative often do not define behaviors that can be broadly understood and applied — at all levels of supervision, across a range of organizations, under varying circumstances, by different people. keep reading…

Business Case for Diversity with Inclusion

Business Case about Diversity with Inclusion

There are few who would argue against positive co-worker relationships and respect for the individual dignity as being helpful in developing a positive workplace environment. Many organizations are proud to display their espoused values like respect, teamwork, individual dignity, and integrity on plagues throughout the workplace. And yet, even in these organizations, people find themselves faced with a range of behaviors and predicaments that “fly in the face” of the well-intended values. Even in workplaces where the intentions are genuine, some people find obstacles to their full engagement based not on issues of qualification and performance, but rather on the visible and invisible group memberships they represent.

Historically, American workplace has been a bastion of male dominance. The literature is replete with examples of male dominance in the work place with a particular emphasis on the dominance of white men in particular. However, over the past 25 years we have seen a number of changes and trend developments that have had significant impact on business and other organizations who seek to thrive in the modern economic environment. Of particular interest to this topic area are the significant changes and trends in the demography of markets and the talent required for sustainable competitive advantage. Keep reading…

Case Study for Employee Performance Evaluation By Ahp

Study about Employee Performance Evaluation By Ahp

Summary: Employee performance evaluation is designed to assess each individual’s contribution to the organization. The performance of individuals against organizational goals determines whether the organization meets its goals. The basic objectives of performance evaluations are two-fold: firstly to reward employees for meeting organizational objectives and secondly to identify which objectives are not met and to develop action plans to ensure they are achieved in future. The present paper uses analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to evaluate employees performances based upon the criteria: quantity/quality of the work, planning/organization, initiative/commitment, teamwork/cooperation, communication and external factors.

Introduction: In the organizational context, performance is usually defined as the extent to which an organizational member contributes to achieving the goals of the organization. Performance appraisal is defined as “the process of identifying, evaluating and developing the work performance of the employee in the organization, so that organizational goals and objectives are effectively achieved while, at the same time, benefiting employees in terms of recognition, receiving feedback, and offering career guidance” (Lansbury, 1988). The terms ‘performance assessment’, ‘performance evaluation’, ‘performance management’ are also used to describe the process. Employee performance appraisal has been practiced by numerous organizations since centuries. Keep reading…

Case Study in Organizational Communication as an Important Factor of Company Success

A Case Study about Organizational Communication as an Important Factor of Company Success: Bosnia and Herzegovina

Abstract: It is not possible to have good human relations without communication. On the other hand effective communication is required not only for human relations but for a good and successful business. In practice there is no organization without communication. There are organizations with bad communication and these cannot be considered successful organizations. Managers spend the majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to–face discussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very important part of their work because a lot of work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups. This is the reason why communication has become more important in companies.





It is not possible to have good human relations without communication. On the other hand effective communication is required not only for human relations but for a good and successful business. In practice there is no organization without communication. There are organizations with bad communication and these cannot be considered successful organizations. Managers spend the majority of their time communicating in several forms: meeting, face-to–face discussion, letters, emails etc. Also more and more employees realize that communication is a very important part of their work because a lot of work activities are based on teamwork among workers in different functional groups.

Click here to read more on Organizational Communication


A Case Study on Decision-Making Coordination in Collaborative Product Configuration

A Case Study about Decision-Making Coordination in Collaborative Product Configuration

Abstract: In Software Product Lines (SPLs), product configuration is a decision-making process in which a group of stakeholders choose features for a product. Unfortunately, current configuration technology is essentially single-user-based in which user requirements are interpreted and translated into configuration decisions by a single role commonly referred to as the product manager. This process can be error-prone and time-consuming as it commonly requires back-and-forth interactions between the product manager and the stakeholders to cope with decision onflicts. In this paper, we propose an approach to Collaborative Product Configuration (CPC) that aims at providing effective support for coordinating teamwork decision-making in the context of product configuration. The approach builds on well-known concepts in the SPL arena such as feature models.





Introduction: In Software Product Lines (SPLs), product configuration is a decision-making process in which a group of stakeholders choose features for a product. A feature model is commonly used to guide the configuration process since it breaks down the variabilities and commonalities of product line members into a hierarchy of features. Additionally, feature models encompass constraints that prevent the derivation of inconsistent product specifications, i.e., products containing incompatible features. The widespread acceptance of feature models within the SPL community led to a number of supporting approaches.

Click here to read more on Decision-Making Coordination